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"It's so beautifully arranged on the the plate – you know someone's fingers have been all over it." – Julia Child

My partner in crime, Maria has been on location for a bit, so I whipped up one of my basics to share on the blog. Almond milk has  been one of my favorite milk alternatives for years. It’s a simple process, and so worth the effort. Trust me, once you make your own, you’ll never buy it in a store again.

I’m a bit of a purist, and I like to keep my milk on the simple side. That said, there are multiple ways to jazz it up if  you’d like. I have some recommended variations that follow the recipe.

One of my recent obsessions is Dorset Maple Reserve -Vermont Maple Syrup, Bourbon Barrel Aged.  It is amazing! I’ve been using it to sweeten my almond milk and my coffee.

ALMOND MILK

Makes about 3 cups

1 cup raw soaked almonds
3 ½  cups filtered water
pinch of good salt
sweetener of choice – maple syrup, honey, agave
cheese cloth or nut milk bag
blender

– Soak the almonds in filtered water for at least 6 hours, or just soak overnight.

– Drain, rinse and place the almonds in a blender.

– Add the 3 ½ cups of filtered water and the salt.

– Blend on high for about 2 minutes. Taste, and add a sweetener if desired. I prefer maple syrup, but use what you like. Start with a small amount, about  ½ teaspoon. You can always add more if you need it.

– Strain the almonds with a cheesecloth-lined strainer, or a nut milk bag. Press or squeeze the milk through the strainer in order to get all the milk.

– Store the milk in a jar in your refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Variations: Try adding cinnamon, vanilla bean or vanilla extract, trading out the almonds for raw cashews or raw Brazil nuts.

– You can save the almond meal to use for  things like “breading” for chicken, fish, pork, or casseroles. It can also be added to oatmeal, smoothies or yogurt as a topping.

– Simply line a baking sheet with parchment paper and bake at 200°F for about 2 hours until it is dry and crumbly. Store in an airtight container.

-If you decide to make nut milk more than once, a nut milk bag  will really come in handy, and they’re environmentally friendly. There are plenty to choose from.

 

If you’re in New York today, you may be in need of our book, Winter Cocktails. It was SOLD OUT for a while but, it’s available again (insert sigh of relief)! If you don’t already own a copy, here are a few places you can order from. Our publisher Quirk Books as well as Apple and Amazon. This cover image was actually a limited edition for Williams-Sonoma that is no longer available online, but, you may be lucky and find one at your local store that hasn’t sold out yet.

Enjoy!

One of our favorite drinks from the book is the Golden Hog. The fresh pineapple & candied bacon will get ya every time!

 

You’ve hopefully detoxed from holiday party extravaganzas and have settled back into the day-to-day routine. But, if your resolutions are already in danger of being ignored, at least opt for changing up your eating and drinking routine. Start with this shrub—  a drink with bright and zesty flavors made with ingredients that you’ll find pretty surprising!

And if you’re wondering what on earth this “shrub” thing we’re talking about is, here’s a quick introduction: Shrubs are fruit-flavored sweetened vinegars that originated in colonial America as a method of preservation. They’ve had a resurgence in the more recent past, particularly in the cocktail world.  The combination possibilities are practically endless: you can mix and match vinegars (from champagne to apple cider) with fruits, and for extra flavor, herbs.  Stir them into basic cocktails like gin-and-tonics for a unique twist or pour them, like in the following, into some bubbly. Teetotaler? Sub the sparkling wine with sparkling water.

SCARLET SIPPER

For the Shrub
Makes about 2 cups

1 cup granulated sugar
2 cups red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
12 ounces beets, scrubbed, peeled, and cubed
1 cup fresh mint
¼ cup fresh thyme leaves

– In a quart-sized container with a lid, combine the sugar, vinegar, and ginger. Cover container and shake to combine.  Add the beets and mint, ensuring that everything is submerged. Add more vinegar if needed.

– Cover the container and let stand for 2 days in a cool, dry place, shaking every 6 to 8 hours to redistribute the ingredients.  Strain the shrub and discard the solids.  The shrub will keep for up to 3 months in the refrigerator.

For the Cocktail
Makes 1

– Fill a highball or other glass with ice. Add 3 to 4 tablespoons shrub and top with prosecco or champagne. Garnish with fresh thyme and mint, if desired.