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"It's so beautifully arranged on the the plate – you know someone's fingers have been all over it." – Julia Child

Posts from the Summer Category

Lemonade

Lemonade

Lemonade

Lemonade

BREAKING NEWS: We’re working on our second book!  Even as “Winter Cocktails” was enjoying its moment in the sun (or snow, rather), its summer mate was already being thought about. And drunk about.

Expect boozed up iced teas, milkshakes, and granitas, as well as classic cocktails and antidotes for those raucous summer nights we all indulge in.

Have a taste! This is one of the recipes in progress (much better than what that kid down the block is peddling).

AND! If you have any suggestions for the name, do tell. We’ll send you an autographed copy of the book when it’s out.

AS YET NAMELESS COCKTAIL
Makes 4 (about 4-ounce drinks)
4 ounces (1/2 cup) freshly squeezed lemon juice, from about 6 lemons
4 ounces (1/2 cup) demerara simple syrup*
6 tablespoons hibiscus tea*
4 ounces (1/2 cup) pisco
2 ounces (1/4 cup) Lillet blanc
2 ounces (1/4 cup) St. Germain elederflower liqueur
Ice cubes

- Combine all ingredients in a shaker (we sometimes use a mason jar) and shake vigorously. Strain into an ice-filled glass and garnish with a lemon twist, if desired.

- Cheers!

Be sure to follow the “Summer” girls on Instagram for behind-the-scenes #summercocktailsbook and for our usual shenanigans and wacky hijinks!
@tstriano @sacasastylist @misspaloma @emilyrickardstylist

Expect “Summer Cocktails” (Quirk Books) next year.

*For the demerara simple syrup: Combine 1 cup demerara sugar and 1 cup water in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until sugar has dissolved entirely. Remove saucepan from heat and cool syrup completely. Syrup may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. Yield: About 2 cups.
*Dried hibiscus flowers (or flor de jamaica) can be found in many specialty stores and also in the Latin American aisle of many supermarkets. Alternatively, order online or substitute with sachets of hibiscus tea. I like to use a 2-to-1 ratio of water to flowers. Bring the mixture to a boil, allow to steep off the heat for 30 minutes, then strain through a sieve and discard solids. Whatever amount you decide to make, store in airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

 

Guest Chef: Dean Sheremet

We spend a lot of time thinking of recipes and images to share with you on this blog, and sharing food, even if just virtually, is in effect the backbone not only of this blog, but the notion of food in general.

With that in mind, Cookin’ and Shootin’ will start introducing you to the chefs, creatives, and food lovers that inspire us (and sometimes, feed us!).

We start what will hopefully begin a delicious series with Dean Sheremet, fellow FCI graduate (ahem, we both graduated top of the class – just saying), Nobu and Jean-Georges alum, culinary TV presenter, and pal. This end-of-summer biyaldi, layered with vegetables, is a warm, deeply flavored, and robust dish that will bridge the gap between the seasons.

The recipe follows, as do details on where you can find Dean on social media, so be sure to add him to your list of people to follow. Lastly, a little Q&A, based on the ever-entertaining Proust questionnaire.

Cooking background: French Culinary Institute class of 2010, Nobu, Jean-Georges

Currently: TV projects, writing, recipe developing

What is your idea of perfect happiness, were it food? Any meal shared with friends.
And wine.

What is your greatest food fear? (Insert flashback) Not having mise ready at service.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself as a chef?  In the heat of service, I can be very stringent.

What is the trait you most deplore in fellow cooks? Laziness and lack of accountability.

What is your greatest food extravagance? The time I went to the French Laundry, and I wanted to experience everything. I couldn’t turn down the bread, and 21 courses later, I literally felt like I was going to throw up.

What is your favorite food journey? I’m still on it.

On what occasion do you lie in the kitchen?  I sometimes gloss over ingredients that I put in food that they may not eat. (Apologies to my vegetarian friends – read: duck fat).

What do you dislike most in a food’s appearance? I hate dead herbs on a plate. Or herbs on the rim of a plate. Actually, just any misguided herbs.

Which living chef do you despise the most? It’s more a quality than a person: Egotism.

What is your greatest food regret? Sending out overcooked salmon. Sorry, table 56.

What or who is the greatest culinary love of your life? Doing prep – it’s when I feel at peace.

When and where were you happiest cooking? Cooking on the line at JG, at a really high level, and cooking without fear.

What is the cooking talent you would most like to have? Patience.

What is your current state of mind? Restless.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? I have a hard time letting go.

If you could change one thing about your family, what would it be? I’d have my grandmother back on this earth.

What do you consider your greatest achievement? Work ethic.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? Working brunch.

What is the quality you most like in a man? Trustworthiness.

What is the quality you most like in a woman? Wit.

What do you most  value in your friends? Knowing they  have my back no matter what.

Favorite hero of fiction? Sherlock Holmes.

Who are your heroes in real life?  My grandmother.

What is it that you most dislike? Ignorance.

How would you like to die? Happy.

What is your motto?  Memento mori.

Ingredients

Mixing and Tasting

Assembly Time

Baked & Ready to Eat

END-OF-SUMMER BIYALDI

Serves 6 to 8

For the Orange Braised Fennel

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½  yellow onion, finely chopped
1 small fennel head, core removed and
Sliced thin
Finely grated zest plus 1/3 cup juice (from 1 orange)
¼ cup Sauvignon Blanc
1 cup ricotta cheese (your choice of skim or full-fat)

Heat the oil in a medium pan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the onion and fennel and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes.

Add the orange zest and juice and white wine and cook until the liquid has almost evaporated, another 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Stir in the ricotta.

For Eggplant Purée

3 Japanese eggplant, diced (about 1 ½ cups)
½  yellow onion, finely chopped
Salt
3 garlic cloves, finely grated
Pinch of Aleppo or cayenne pepper
1/3 cup store-bought tomato sauce of your choice
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the eggplant, onion, and a bit of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until eggplant is golden brown and onion is softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more. Add the tomato sauce and scrape up any bits stuck to the bottom of the pan.

Set aside to cool slightly, then stir in the vinegar and Aleppo pepper and pulse it in a food processor just until chunky. Season with salt and set aside.

For the Biyaldi and Assembly

2 small Japanese eggplant, sliced thinly lengthwise (ideally on a mandolin)
Olive oil
2 Gold Bar yellow squash, sliced thinly lengthwise (ideally on a mandolin)
Salt
1 cup (2 ounces) grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
½ cup plain panko
1 rosemary sprig, chopped (about 2 teaspoons)
½ cup store-bought tomato sauce

- Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and preheat oven to 400°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

- Toss the eggplant with just enough oil to coat, and arrange the slices in a single layer on one of the prepared baking sheets. Roast the eggplant until golden and soft, about 10 minutes.

- While the eggplant is roasting, arrange the squash in a single layer over a few clean kitchen towels and season liberally with salt, after about 10 minutes, wipe them dry of any moisture and excess salt.

- Grease a 13- by 9-inch casserole with olive oil. Spread the bottom of the dish with tomato sauce. Arrange half of the sliced eggplant to the bottom of the dish, gently overlapping the slices. Dollop and gently spread, first, with some of the braised fennel, then with some of the eggplant purée. Top with a layer of squash slices, then repeat procedure with remaining ingredients.

- Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F. Cover the dish with foil and bake for 30 minutes.  Combine the cheese and panko in a small bowl; drizzle enough olive oil to moisten the mixture. Remove the foil and sprinkle the top with breadcrumbs. Place under the broiler until the cheese starts to melt and the breadcrumbs gently brown

- Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Find Dean’s recipes at www.deansheremet.com and follow him on Twitter (@deansheremet.com) and Instagram deansheremet

And of course, you can find us cavorting on Instagram as well @tstriano and @sacasastylist

Sandia

 

Sandia Drinks

 

It’s begun to sizzle and we’re starting to feel a trickle of salty sweat pooling in the nest of our lower backs. It sounds risqué, but it’s just plain hot and sticky, and all we can think of is: Cabana boy!!! Where’s my cocktail?

During the summer, watermelon and cucumbers are some of the coolest and most quenching of snacks. I usually keep big bowl chilling in the fridge, eating them plain, or adding salt, lime juice, and dried chile powder to the cucumbers. The combination is a great salad base, too – try them with a light lemon-lime-cilantro vinaigrette and cubes of seared haloumi.

And, naturally, the temptation to turn the duo into a cocktail proved irresistible. This refresher starts with muddled cilantro, mint, jalapeño, and sugar for a vibrant, herbal base with a sharp prick of heat. Watermelon and cucumber are pureed with ice into a slushy-like juice, and finally, fiery, floral pisco is stirred in. One sip and you’ll beat the heat.

WATERMELON-CUCUMBER REFRESHER
Serves 2

Note: If you prefer a cocktail with less heat, scrape out and discard the seeds and ribs from the pepper.

I always like a hit of salt to balance out sweetness; if using cucumber spears as garnish, lightly season them prior to serving.

Pisco is a potent grape brandy popular in Perú and Chile. I love it for its fiery burn and floral notes, but, this cocktail can also be made with your choice of spirit. I recommend tequila blanco, light rum, Hendrick’s gin, or vodka. Or, leave the booze out altogether and enjoy this as a summery smoothie.

¼ cup packed fresh cilantro leaves, plus sprigs for garnish
¼ cup packed fresh mint leaves, plus leaves for garnish
½ jalapeño pepper, chopped, plus rings for garnish
3 tablespoons granulated or raw cane sugar
Salt
2 cups (½-inch) dice watermelon (about 12 ounces)
¼ English cucumber, cut into ½-inch dice, remainder cut into spears for garnish
3 to 4 ounces pisco
Crushed ice, to taste

- Chill 2 (12-ounce) glasses by filling them with ice water and swirling them around for 2 to 3 minutes. Drain and discard the ice water and dry the glasses.

- Muddle the cilantro, mint, jalapeño, sugar, and pinch of salt in a shaker (use either a muddler or the back of a wooden spoon). The leaves should only be bruised, not completely smashed.  Divide the mixture between the two glasses.

- In a blender, pulse the watermelon, cucumber, and pisco until completely puréed. Add crushed ice and pulse once again to combine. Divide mixture between glasses and stir to gently combine. Garnish with cilantro sprigs, mint leaves, cucumber spears, and/or jalapeño rings. Serve immediately.

Fennel 101

Fennel 101

Working on photo sets is often a battle of the bulge: catering and craft services sometimes don’t offer enough healthy choices, or, tempt you with enough treats and goodies that you ignore the more healthful options. Opting for the iceberg salad (hold the dressing) over the gravy-smothered mashed potatoes requires an iron will, and sometimes ours is more feathery in composition.

On evenings at home and during the weekends, we try to go back to our smart eating ways and make food that is both good for our bodies and our palates. We’re both firm believers that eating a salad doesn’t have to be a punishment or a “diet” menu item, but rather an opportunity to take advantage of great fresh produce and put something in our bellies that won’t  make them expand.

This salad has quinoa, a grain that will satisfy your complex carb craving and deliver protein. It’s lightly toasted to enhance its naturally nutty flavor, then cooled down and tossed with crisp fennel, tart Granny smith apple, buttery avocado, fiery serranos, and a simple vinaigrette that ties it all together.

FENNEL, APPLE, QUINOA, AND AVOCADO SALAD

Serves 4

For the Quinoa
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 shallot, minced
1 garlic clove minced
1 cup red or white quinoa, or a combination of both
1 teaspoon salt
Water

- Heat the oil over medium heat in a medium saucepan until shimmering. Add the shallot and cook, stirring, until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until softened and fragrant, about 1 minute. Transfer to small bowl.

- Increase the heat to medium-high and cook the quinoa, stirring occasionally, until fragrant and toasted, about 5 minutes. Return the shallot and garlic to the pot, add the salt, and add enough water to cover the quinoa by about 2 inches. Bring the mixture to a boil and cook for 15 minutes. Drain the quinoa, return it to the pot, cover it, and allow it to sit for 10 minutes. Cool completely. (To speed up the cooling process, spread the quinoa out onto a rimmed baking sheet.)

- The quinoa may be prepared up to 2 days in advance and stored in an airtight container, refrigerated.

For the Dressing
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice from about 2 lemons
1 tablespoon honey
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

- Whisk the mustard, lemon juice, honey, and garlic together in medium bowl. While constantly whisking, drizzle in the olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Allow dressing to sit for at least 30 minutes at room temperature to allow flavors to meld. Whisk dressing to recombine prior to using.

For the Salad
Juice of 1 lemon
1 fennel bulb
1 Granny Smith apple
1 firm but ripe avocado, peeled and sliced
1 to 2 serrano peppers (to taste), ribs and seeds removed, thinly sliced

- Fill a medium bowl with cold water and add the lemon juice. Trim off and reserve the fennel fronds, thinly slice the stems, trim and discard the bottom of the bulb then cut it in half and thinly slice it. Place the fennel pieces and slices in the acidulated water to prevent it from oxidizing.

- Cut the apple in half, remove the cores (use a 1 teaspoon measure for easy coring) and thinly slice. Drain the fennel thoroughly, add the apple and avocado, and drizzle with come of the vinaigrette, gently tossing to combine. Add the peppers and quinoa and additional vinaigrette to taste. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with reserved fennel fronds.

Fennel 101

We’re no strangers to stiff drinks and bubbly, and admittedly, once in a while, the party goes on longer than expected and the next morning finds us with pillow-creased faces, raccoon eyes, and The Dreaded Hangover.

Usually, a greasy diner breakfast egg on a roll with extra bacon and half-bottle of ketchup plus a full pot of coffee (Mexican Coca-Cola on ice is my go-to) helps smooth us out, but a stronger antidote is sometimes absolutely necessary: enter the michelada, a spiced and seasoned Mexican beer cocktail.

The drink’s base is always a chilled pale lager, like Corona, Pacícifo, Sol, or Modelo Especial – you want something refreshing and light, save the hoppy dark stuff for the pub. The bracing backbone is provided by umami-dense Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce (Cholula and Valentina are our favorites), and a good amount of freshly-squeezed lime juice. A “cubito Maggi,” a bouillon cube made by Maggi (pronounced Ma-ghi) is a common addition and adds extra seasoning. You can skip the cubito, but do rub a lime around the lip of your glass and rim it with coarse salt, pepper, and if available, powdered red chili. And always, always, always pack your glass with crushed ice.

And, while we’re talking about getting pickled, I recently made Paula Deen’s pickled shrimp and thought they’d make a great side to the michelada. Our version has hotter-than-hell Serrano peppers, impossibly fragrant kaffir lime leaves, toasty fresh curry leaves, spices, and a hit of tequila.

Note: Of course, the michelada is also perfect for any sweltering day, not just a fuzzy morning. Try it this summer, and, for the condiment-phobic, mix up a chelada: salt rim, lime juice, ice, and beer.
¡Salud! And ¡Happy cinco de mayo!

MICHELADA

Serves 1

Note: For an extra frosty drink, chill your glass prior to assembling. For a quick cool-down, fill a glass with ice and water, swirl for 1 minute, then drain.

¼ cup fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Worcestershire sauce, to taste
Hot sauce, such as Cholula or Valentina, to taste
½ Maggi bouillon cube (optional)
Crushed ice
1 (12-ounce) bottle of pale lager such as Corona, Pacífico, Sol, or Modelo Especial, chilled

- Rub a lime around the rim of a pint glass or equal capacity glass. Combine 1 tablespoon salt and 1 teaspoon pepper in small plate and dip rim in mixture, turning glass until rim is coated.

- Add lime juice, Worcestershire, hot sauce, and (optional) bouillon cube to glass and stir to combine. Add crushed ice, pour in beer, gently stir, and drink. Refill glass with beer as needed.
PICKLED SHRIMP

Makes 2 pints

Note: Kaffir lime leaves and fresh curry leaves can be found at specialty Middle Eastern markets or online. They keep well frozen, so stock up and store them in zipper-lock bags.

You will need 2 (1-pint) mason jars for this recipe.

24 – 30 large cooked, peeled, and deveined shrimp (tails on)
½ cup white vinegar
¼ cup water
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
2 teaspoons coriander seeds
8 garlic cloves
½ teaspoon salt
¼ cup fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons white tequila
4 serrano chiles, halved lengthwise
12 kaffir lime leaves
4 sprigs fresh curry leaves

- In small saucepan, combine vinegar, water, peppercorns, coriander, salt, and garlic. Bring to boil over medium-high heat and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature. Stir in lime juice and tequila.

- Pack the shrimp, serranos, kaffir lime leaves, and curry leaves into 2 (1-pint) mason jars. Pour in the vinegar mixture, adding water if needed to fully submerge the shrimp. Seal the jars and chill for at least 8 hours and up to overnight prior to serving.

The weather turned cold and brisk from one day to the next; without warning we went from wearing shorts and tanks to drawers brimming over with light sweaters and scarves. Luckily, we snatched up the end of summer’s ripest, reddest tomatoes and preserved them. A few weeks from now, we’ll be able to reinvent those fruits and memories of summer in pasta dishes, chunky stews, and hearty soups.

Tara is crazy about putting up fruits and vegetables — crisp vegetables in brine, sweet fruits in syrup, and of course, sauce-perfect tomatoes. One of her favorite books is Put ‘em Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton, but you can use your preferred recipes to preserve any of the seasonal produce you love; it’s the perfect way to recall the warmer months.

I woke up early and headed to the 68th and Lex to wait for the Jitney to the North Fork. Within two hours, concrete buildings and city sidewalks melted into quaint peak-roofed steeples and clumsily hand-painted signs that said “Fresh Pie” and “CORN.”

I sat on a bench after the bus had deposited me and Tara zoomed up in her car. I hopped in, getaway-car-style, and we took a whirlwind tour of the farm stands and markets in town, ignoring the picturesque scenes and focusing instead on the violent rolling of the clouds, bellies about to burst with rain. In a matter of minutes we’d picked up hot and sweet Italian sausages at Love Lane Market in Mattituck, duck eggs at Wells Homestead Market on the main road in Aquebogue, vegetables at Schmitt’s Farmstand on Sound Avenue in Riverhead, and cider doughnuts and a loaf of shiny-skinned brioche at Junta’s Pastry in Jamesport.

The storm still threatening, we started up the grill and threw everything on— sausages, bread, Brussels sprouts, whole heads of garlic, zucchini—without fussing over much. We were on warp speed because of the weather, but it was very apropos: the whole point of our shoot and cookout had been to shop locally and pile food on the grill; easy prep that required nothing but olive oil, salt, pepper, and fresh herb-flecked butter,  so we could enjoy the last official weekend of summer—and all the wine from Croteoaux Vineyard in Southold.

The recipes below are more of a guideline than a strict how-to; keeping it simple so you have time to kick back and relax is the most important thing.

NO-FUSS COOKOUT

Olive oil
Salt and pepper
Assorted sausages, poked all over with a fork
Crusty bread, sliced about 1-inch thick
Assorted vegetables, sliced about ¾-inch thick
Whole heads of garlic

Heat grill according to manufacturer’s instructions. Brush all ingredients with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Arrange all ingredients in single layer on grill and cook until sausages are plump, charred, and cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes, and vegetables are tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Serve.

RUSTIC CAPRESE SALAD    

Grilled garlic (see recipe above)
Heirloom tomatoes, sliced ¼-inch thick
Fresh mozzarella, pulled into bite-size pieces
Olive oil
Salt and pepper
Fresh basil leaves

Once cooled, peel garlic and squeeze out with fingertips. Arrange tomatoes, mozzarella, and garlic on plate or cutting board and drizzle with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Scatter basil leaves over; serve.

FRESH HERB BUTTER

1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1/2 cup mixed fresh herbs (such as thyme, oregano, and marjoram), finely chopped
Salt and pepper

Combine butter and herbs in small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Serve alongside grilled proteins, vegetables, and bread; spread lavishly.

It has been a long, hot, sweaty summer. We’ve enjoyed the sunshine stretching out lazily into the evening, pink twilights spent drinking frosty beers on crowded restaurant patios, and eating farmers’ market seasonal produce like garnet red cherries and bright yellow squash blossoms. But, despite the summer fun and sun, we do admit to ogling boutique mannequins as they unblushingly strip out of flowy sundresses and slip into leather pants and boyfriend sweaters. It’s time to turn the page, but, not before we squeeze in one last recipe that hip-hip-hoorays the bounty of the warmest months.

Cobblers are the perfect dessert to highlight and celebrate fresh produce: quickly cooked and lightly flavored with little other than a bit of butter and sugar, the fruit, as it rightfully should, remains the main attraction. This version begins on the stovetop, where butter is cooked until nutty in aroma and color. Next, slices of marigold yellow-and-crimson peaches are sautéed briefly with a touch of sugar and a splash of smoky Bourbon just to get their juices flowing.

This is where you should pay special attention: we’ve had many cobblers that are topped with biscuits. A lovely concept in that biscuits are light and tender and will imbibe all the gooey runoff from the cobbler, but in practice, often a disappointment. The biscuit topping becomes mired in the fruit and the point of contact between the dough and the filling never cooks through properly, resulting in a soggy-bottomed—and often raw—mess.

To avoid this problem, the biscuit topping here is frugal and scattered in small pieces over the topping. These will bake along with the fruit in under 15 minutes, and the result will be properly cooked, crisp, textured mini-biscuits that contrast the supple peach filling. Oh, and, there’s fresh thyme in the topping that adds the subtle herbal scent of a late summer garden.

Gather ye peaches while you may — and, also, happy Labor Day weekend!

SWEET & SAVORY PEACH-THYME COBBLER
Serves 4 to 6
Fresh thyme leaves in the biscuit crumble topping of this cobbler add a savory hint to this classic summer dessert.

For the Thyme Biscuit Topping
¾ cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, plus additional for garnish
¾ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
⅛ teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into slices and chilled
5 tablespoons buttermilk, chilled

For the Peaches
½ stick (2 ounces) unsalted butter
4 ripe but firm peaches, pitted and sliced into 8 wedges
2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
2 teaspoons lemon juice1 tablespoon Bourbon (optional)
⅛ teaspoon salt

For the Thyme Biscuit Topping: Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 425°F.

In large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, brown sugar, lemon zest, thyme, baking powder, salt, and baking soda. Add butter slices to flour mixture and toss to coat. Working quickly, press slices of butter between thumb and forefinger, tossing in between presses, until butter is evenly distributed.

With a rubber spatula, stir in buttermilk, working dough just until combined. Quickly gather dough into ball and refrigerate while you make the peach base.

For the Peaches: Melt butter in 10-inch shallow skillet over medium heat until it begins to foam and brown flecks begin to be visible, 3 to 4 minutes. Add peaches, brown sugar, lemon juice, optional Bourbon, and salt, and cook, stirring gently and occasionally, until peaches begin to soften and release juices, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Pinch off ¼-inch pieces of biscuit dough and scatter over peaches. Bake cobbler until biscuit topping is golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer skillet to cooling rack and allow to cool 5 minutes prior. Sprinkle with thyme leaves and serve.

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